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Academic Skills for Graduate Students

The Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (VPTL) provides Stanford graduate students one-on-one academic coaching and other strategic resources during your time on campus. Whether continuing your studies as a co-term, resuming your place at the Farm in a graduate program, or coming to Stanford from another institution or industry, being a graduate student presents unique challenges that require sophisticated and often non-intuitive academic skills you’ll need to keep up with the pace, volume, and complexity of graduate level studies. Our academic skill coaches can help you create structure and balance in your aåcademic and personal life in order to make the most of Stanford. Use our resources for advice on time management, reading strategies, managing procrastination, and developing resilience.

Academic Skills Coaching

One-on-one sessions are available by appointment. You can schedule directly on our calendar.

Academic Skills Workshops

Request a workshop for your group on topics such as procrastination, time management, work/life balance, and resilience. Contact Adina Glickman: adinag@stanford.edu

Study Tips Resources

These downloadable handouts provide tips on time management, note-taking, reading, as well as test preparation and taking. Print these handouts and templates to enhance and guide your learning.

Academic Skills Inventory

The Academic Skills Inventory online tool will help you evaluate your current strategies and offer suggestions on how to build on your existing skills and approaches.

The Resilience Project

Resilience Logo

The Resilience Project is a resource that uses personal narratives, programming, and coaching to motivate and support students as they experience the normal, academic setbacks that are part of a rigorous education. We emphasize the importance of failure in the learning process and seek to instill a sense of belonging and bravery in students so that they are able to embrace failure not as something to be avoided at all costs, but essential to a meaningful education.

The Duck Stops Here

Duckstop Duck

The Duck Stop weekly blog offers research-based and timely advice on academic and life skills. Although written primarily for undergraduates, much of the advice is applicable to graduate students.